“All changes, even the most longed for, have their melancholy; for what we leave behind us is a part of ourselves; we must die to one life before we can enter another.”
Anatole France

I have been reading and re-reading the comments to The Change Equation: The Beginning.  My deepest thanks goes to all those in our brilliant and discerning blogger community who joined the dialogue.  Your humour, joy and wisdom have added so much to this discussion and to my personal understanding. It appears that the change equation will have a series of iterations.

I was told to wipe the smile off my face, if I was going to be taken seriously.  The article was clear, to the point, complete with a set of instructions on how to tilt the chin, make eye contact and minimize the shrillness of my voice.  Beware of overusing the smile.  Leaders employ this technique with careful precision to diminish the likelihood of being taken as the junior assistant.  Too much smiling is hazardous for those climbing the social or corporate ladder. If I follow “leadership protocol” in my body language as prescribed by experts, I am certain to pass the networking gauntlet with flying colours. 

“Once in awhile, 
Right in the middle of an ordinary life, 
Love gives us a fairy tale.”
 Anonymous

 A special thanks to all my blogger friends who joined the Wedding Dialogues.  Your thoughtful comments and “likes” were much appreciated.

The Wedding Dialogues would not be complete without an epilogue containing some final thoughts on transitions. 

Spring Flowers

And they lived happily ever after….well, that is until the end of the story which is,

Till death (or divorce) us do part…”

There is an end to a marriage. The statistics, no matter how you interpret them, confirm that divorce is a reality.  And then there is death.  The statistics are quite firm on that point.  We are left with the unpleasant, if somewhat intimidating thought that, one way or another, there is an ending to the wedding story.

“Beware the barrenness of a busy life.” Socrates

The other day I met up with some friends who spent a considerable amount of time discussing how busy they were.  It became a competition.  Who was the busiest?  I even found myself contributing to this jumble of “busies.” In the end, I really didn’t know how much actual communication had taken place.  That is, until I realized that messages were scattered in between our “busy lists.”