“All changes, even the most longed for, have their melancholy; for what we leave behind us is a part of ourselves; we must die to one life before we can enter another.”
Anatole France

I have been reading and re-reading the comments to The Change Equation: The Beginning.  My deepest thanks goes to all those in our brilliant and discerning blogger community who joined the dialogue.  Your humour, joy and wisdom have added so much to this discussion and to my personal understanding. It appears that the change equation will have a series of iterations.

I was told to wipe the smile off my face, if I was going to be taken seriously.  The article was clear, to the point, complete with a set of instructions on how to tilt the chin, make eye contact and minimize the shrillness of my voice.  Beware of overusing the smile.  Leaders employ this technique with careful precision to diminish the likelihood of being taken as the junior assistant.  Too much smiling is hazardous for those climbing the social or corporate ladder. If I follow “leadership protocol” in my body language as prescribed by experts, I am certain to pass the networking gauntlet with flying colours. 

Serenity

Over the years, I collected words to represent special days.   Resolutions signify a New Year, gifts denote birthdays, hearts for Valentines, flowers for Mother’s Day, books for Father’s Day, and music for Christmas.  These day-word pairings are rather obvious, especially when reinforced by the seasonal advertising campaigns that have the power to seduce even the hardened penny-pincher.

Weddings, on the other hand, are extra, extra special. Whether formal or informal, weddings are uniquely personal for two people who have chosen a life together.  Friends and family come to celebrate their joy, but the day belongs to the couple.  The only word that reflects the magnitude of a wedding is “vow”, a solemn promise.

Springtime reminds me that everything must be done at the right time for the right reason to achieve a successful outcome. And I owe it all to the flowers. There is a short time frame for blooming. So I head out in the early morning, camera in hand, to capture a specific moment, knowing with certainty that if I wait until tomorrow it will be lost. Forever! Well, not exactly forever but until the next spring which is months away. I will have to wait.