Celebrating New Year 2021 with Robert Burns

Happy New Year!

Mary Jo Malo inspired me today to remember the words of Robert Burns in his poem Auld Lang Syne.

Every New Year celebration, we join others across the globe to sing this song of friendship. It is a poignant reminder that belonging to a compassionate community builds strength and resilience.

Last year, as we entered 2020, a new year and a new decade, we did not anticipate that we would be wearing masks and following social distancing protocol on the eve of 2021.

And yet, we again turn to Robert Burns and sing, “we’ll tak’ a cup o’ kindness yet, for auld lang syne.”

There is a moment of reflection that accompanies the transition from one year to another. It is a milestone that allows us to examine the passage of time and look forward to what comes next. Whatever that may be, our efforts and energies are focused on adding to the breadth and depth of knowledge and experience. In so doing, we are active participants in creating positive outcomes, now and for future generations.

Please join me as I travel to the birthplace of Robert Burns: Alloway, a village in South Ayrshire, Scotland, located on the River Doon.

Auld Lang Syne

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and auld lang syne?[a]

Chorus:

For auld lang syne, my jo,
for auld lang syne,
we’ll tak’ a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

And surely ye’ll be your pint-stoup!
and surely I’ll be mine!
And we’ll tak’ a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

Chorus

We twa hae run about the braes,
and pou’d the gowans fine;
But we’ve wander’d mony a weary fit,
sin’ auld lang syne.

Chorus

We twa hae paidl’d in the burn,
frae morning sun till dine;[b]
But seas between us braid hae roar’d
sin’ auld lang syne.

Chorus

And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere!
and gie’s a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll tak’ a right gude-willie waught,
for auld lang syne.

Chorus

76 Replies to “Celebrating New Year 2021 with Robert Burns”

  1. Good thoughts, Rebecca! I wish you a better year! Be healthy and share with us all the wonders of the world!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Happy New Year, my friend. I look forward to a fresh new year together. We may not be able to travel the world, but we are able to embrace the world that comes to us via technology. All the very best to you in 2021.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Delighted to be starting 2021 with you and Robert Burns in beautiful Alloway! 💙🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿 Here’s hoping that it won’t be long before you can make your next trip to our bonnie shores xxx

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I was thinking of that wonderful course that your recommended last year. I learned so much about Robert Burns. I just found a great website – The Scottish Poetry Library when I was exploring Robert Fergusson and Allan Ramsay. (I understand that these poets influenced Robert Burns.) https://www.scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk/poet/robert-fergusson/. A great benefit of 2020 was that I learned to explore the world virtually. One day we will return the the land of Robert Burns. Happy New Year – the adventures continue!!!

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Dear Marina – what a wonderful feeling to know that we are entering a new year together. I was exploring the word “January” and found that it comes from an ancient Roman custom, the feast of the Roman god Janus, who was the god of beginnings, gates, transitions, time, duality, doorways, passages, frames, and endings. Janus was depicted as having two opposite faces. One face looked back into the past, and the other peered forward. I love the symbolism of doorways where new adventures await just beyond the threshold.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Ah, my dear Rebecca… yes I remember that. I love that symbolism too. Our past is part of us, we carry it as we move forward, our teacher!
        Many hugs, my friend and here’s to a new year in our beautiful friendship! ❤🤗🌟🥂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. The ancient Romans often extrapolated objects or feelings into gods, and the names of those gods indicated what they had been derived from. For example, the Latin verb cupīre meant ‘to long for, desire, wish,’ and from that the Romans created the god Cupid. With regard to January, the Latin word iānus meant ‘an arched passage-way, covered passage, arcade,’ so Ianus (anglicized to Janus) was created as the god of transitions.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Thank you for you excellent explanation, Steve. I have also been fascinated by Ianus aka Janus.

        Like

    1. Thank you, Graham for your best wishes. I also want to thank you for prompting me to explore the idea of Mandala in my journey. Thank you for creating a space that invites learning and discovery. Happy New Year.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Such is the fate of simple Bard,
    On Life’s rough ocean luckless starr’d!
    Unskilful he to note the card
    Of prudent Lore
    Till billows rage, and gales blow hard,
    And whelm him o’er!

    Liked by 4 people

      1. Ah, good that you found a link. I copied it from my little Burns poetry book.
        I have never visited the cottage, and I enjoyed your tour of it!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Found it!!! I looked all over the internet for this book. It seems to be out of print! Love the thistles on the cover.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Since my mother’s parents came to the US from Scotland I appreciated this post very much. Thank you Rebecca for the lovely video and a very Happy New Year to you.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you John!! It seems that there was a great deal of immigration to both the US and Canada. According to the Canadian Encyclopedia: “The Scots are among the first Europeans to establish themselves in Canada and are the third largest ethnic group in the country. In the 2016 Census of Canada, a total of 4,799,005 Canadians, or 14 per cent of the population, listed themselves as being of Scottish origin. My son attends Simon Fraser University which has a pipe band that goes to Scotland every year (except 2020) to compete in the Worlds Championship in Glasgow. I used to visit SFU on Sunday Morning in the summer months just to listen to the bagpipers and drums practicing for the event. Happy New Year, John. All the very best. Or should I say Happy Hogmanay!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Blessings of Peace and Contentment wished for you and yours, Rebecca. Love from North Wales 💙

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Happy New Year, my dear friend. I think that this is our 10 anniversary of entering a new year together. Sending many hugs along with my best wishes and hope for a wonderful 2021.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Wishing you and your family all good things in this new year, Rebecca!
    🙂🙂 🐱🐱 🐱🐱 🐱🐱 🐱

    Have you heard of Scottish singer Edie Reader? She performs a number of Robert Burns poems put to music.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for the introduction to Edie Reader. I found her twitter and am now following her adventures. You have given me a new research project – to find Edie Reader’s Robert Burns poems put to music. Happy New Year – I am thrilled that we are on a musical journey.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Happy New Year, Tim. One of my favourite Robbie Burns quotes is: “There is no such uncertainty as a sure thing.” As I look back to New Years 2020, those words have profound relevance as I enter this year. While humanity seeks certainty, we do our best work in uncertainty. Over the past year, we have learned how to connect via technology, to use masks and social distancing as a way to care for each other, and how to give more respect to our environment. From that perspective, a very good year. I am delighted that we connected in 2020. The adventures continue…

      Liked by 3 people

  7. Thank you, Rebecca, for your friendship and inspiration over the past 7 years. A cup o’ kindness is what our blogging community serves up almost daily. It’s contagious and inspiring. While feet may grow weary plodding daily over obstacles and bodies separated by seas, as long as we still have opportunities for kindness and friendship we can join hands across space and time. Happy New Year again and again and again…

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I am thrilled, Mary Jo, that you have shared your poetry in 2020. You have given me so many wonderful hours of reading. I enjoyed heading our into nature to recite your poetry. Seven years – there is serendipity in the number 7. I just looked it up and found that it signifies completeness and is considered very lucky. As an early prime number in the series of positive integers, the number seven has been associated with a great deal of symbolism. Think of the seven seas, the seven wonders of the ancient world, seven continents and the list goes on and go and on… And so, as we enter 7 years, I have a feeling we are going to have an extraordinary journey. Sending many hugs along with my gratitude for your friendship.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Happy New Year, Su. Thank you for joining the celebration. A wee dram and some haggis????? I must reread Burn’s Address to the Haggis before January 25th. I love reciting poetry, but there are others that have the skill to recite Robert Burn’s poetry!!!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Maybe not the haggis. And Black Bun is more traditional for Hogmanay.
        We’ve had Burns’ Suppers in the past where the “price of admission” for guests was to recite a poem — either their own or one they’ve chosen. So much fun!!!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. What a great idea! What fun that would be to hear how others recite. I have come lately to poetry so am making up for lost time.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. We visited Robert Burns birthplace in 2014. I remember that it rained on and off that day which made it a perfect time to visit. I felt I had gone back in time when I entered the cottage, knowing that every step taken was one that was shared by Robert Burns. He was known for his rebellion against the status quo and presented alternative thoughts through his poetry. I especially appreciate these lines form his poem “To a Mouse, on Turning Her Up in Her Nest With the Plough, November, 1785”

      But, Mousie, thou art no thy-lane,
      In proving foresight may be vain;
      The best-laid schemes o’ mice an’ men
      Gang aft agley,
      An’ lea’e us nought but grief an’ pain,
      For promis’d joy!

      Happy New Year! All the very very best!! Hugs!

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Such an touching classic. I look forward to spending 2021 with you my friend. Happy & Healthy New Year to you and yours Rebecca! 🤩🌃🎆✨🍾

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I share your hope, Jilanne! The year, 2020, has been a time of reflection for all who share this world. We learned, and continue to learn how to navigate our new reality. I think of the thought by C.S. Lewis: “You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.” C.S. Lewis had the best one-liners.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Vielen Dank für Ihre besten Wünsche für 2021. Ich bin dankbar, dass wir gemeinsam in ein neues Jahr starten. Alles Gute für Sie und Ihre wundervolle Familie. Pass auf dich auf. Rebecca

      Like

    1. Thank you for your hopeful and kind wishes. I am looking forward to following your travels via poetry in 2021. You create a space of beauty where all are welcomed.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Ah, Rebecca you are such a bright light. Thank you so much. I’m looking forward to reading your beautiful post , always uplifting, I’m wishing you a wonderful new year! ❤️

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Such a lovely video and a very majestic rendition of this ever popular song. (Chris played a slightly ponderous and not nearly so majestic version, which I sent to family members on NYE. They were most impressed.) I hope this year will be kinder to us all and wish you, Don and your family good health and many joyful moments throughout. 🤗🤗😘

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am so very very proud of Chris. I know that his rendition of Auld Lang Syne added sparkle and joy to your family’s New Year’s Eve celebration. I often imagine how surprised Robert Burns would be to know that so many people celebrated with his song of friendship. Wouldn’t it be great to go back in time to say thank you. All the very best in the new year, my dear friend. The journey continues….

      Liked by 1 person

  10. A lovely post, Rebecca. I enjoyed reading the auld language, simple enjoying to see how fluid it is and how much it changes over time. A wonderful tribute to Robert Burns and beautiful way to ring in the new year. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am delighted that you joined Robert Burns and me on News Years. What a celebration we had! Here’s to a wonderful year of great conversations, Diana. Many hugs coming your way.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I’m eager for the stories we can create together as more of us continue to foster community and expand the idea of what it means to belong. Thank you for the original Scottish verses…I’m looking forward to hearing and understanding more of this beautiful language in 2021.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There are so many stories in the folds of history. I am going to do some research into the meeting of Sir Walter Scott and Robert Burns. The two writers met only once. The encounter occurred in 1786, in Adam Ferguson’s house, in the Sciennes district of Edinburgh. Can you imagine the two men in conversation. Thank you for stopping by and for your heartwarming comments. Happy New Year!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. What a moment that must have been. Thank you for sharing this story with me…I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how we imagine artists in solitude building their work, but in reality much of the beautiful creation happens in collaboration of many sorts! Wishing you a healthy and happy 2021.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Ah, Rabbie!

    I shivered to the music as I watched your video.
    I sing this song any time of year, because it works any time of year.
    His birthday is January 25.
    My step-dad would bring home the haggis every year on the 25th.
    So, I would be sent to bed early, because I would nae eat the haggis.

    However, since my teen years I have been enamoured with his words,(which I memorized and still recite time to time) starting with:

    A RED, RED ROSE

    BY ROBERT BURNS

    O my Luve is like a red, red rose
    That’s newly sprung in June;
    O my Luve is like the melody
    That’s sweetly played in tune.

    So fair art thou, my bonnie lass,
    So deep in luve am I;
    And I will luve thee still, my dear,
    Till a’ the seas gang dry.

    Till a’ the seas gang dry, my dear,
    And the rocks melt wi’ the sun;
    I will love thee still, my dear,
    While the sands o’ life shall run.

    And fare thee weel, my only luve!
    And fare thee weel awhile!
    And I will come again, my luve,
    Though it were ten thousand mile.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I LOVE that song – there is such poignancy, and affirmation of love. I read that Bob Dylan said that Robert Burns’s lyrics/song, A Red, Red Rose, had the biggest effect on his life. (https://www.theguardian.com/music/2008/oct/06/bob.dylan.robert.burns.inspiration) By the way, I love the taste of haggis, especially vegetarian haggis. Here is a recipe for you to try. The secret ingredient is lots of pepper. https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2015/jan/22/how-to-cook-perfect-vegetarian-haggis On January 25, 2021, let’s sing a Red Red Rose together! Many hugs coming your way, my friend.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hahaha! You are so not tempting me with the veggie haggis recipe, but nice try!
        I’ll check out the Dylan link!
        I also adore, “To A Field Mouse” {{{HUGS}}}

        Liked by 1 person

      2. But Mousie, thou art no thy-lane,
        In proving foresight may be vain:
        The best laid schemes o’ Mice an’ Men
        Gang aft agley,
        An’ lea’e us nought but grief an’ pain,
        For promis’d joy!

        Liked by 1 person

  13. I do miss Scotland, I loved my four years at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland. I don’t miss haggis though I was allergic to the barley in it. My brother’s now living full time in Kirkcaldy and working in Edinburgh, he tried living in Edinburgh but it was so expensive he was living in an attic flat in an old tenement about six stories up.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. What a wonderful four years that must have been, Charlotte! There is a wonderful artistic and musical community in Edinburgh. I can understand why your brother is living in Kirkcaldy. We went through Kirkcaldy by train – lovely place to live. The trains make traveling back and forth from Edinburgh an easy commute.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply to marina kanavaki Cancel reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.