Who Gets the Credit?

“No person will make a great business who wants to do it all himself or get all the credit.”
Andrew Carnegie

Richard Arkwright was destined to be called the “Father of the Industrial Revolution.” It is an appropriate title in many respects for he possessed the organizational ability to fit all of the “pieces of the puzzle” together. He was in the right place at the right time; he anticipated the demand and built the supply mechanism – the modern factory system.

It is possible, even probable, that one person will receive the acclaim and the accolades.  It is in our nature to ascribe credit to one person, to point to a singular incident or a specific discovery or invention.  Perhaps it is our way of simplifying the many small details, processes, iterations that work together to create the finished product. We do not usually have the time to ponder the sequence of events. Yet, most of us recognize there are many unsung, unknown people who have worked to bring an idea to life.  There is always more to the story; it is this “more” that makes the end result the stuff of legends.

William Shakespeare once wrote, All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players: they have their exits and their entrances; and one man in his time plays many parts, his acts being seven ages.” There are many players on the Richard Arkwright “stage,” each one contributing to the success of the venture. Their lives were defined by the age in which they lived and their inherent desire to innovate. They looked beyond convention and shunned mediocrity.  They played their parts well. Curtain time…

The Pathway

87 thoughts on “Who Gets the Credit?

  1. The people who get the credit tend to be those who are the most visible. Take film awards, for example. When most people watch them, they only care about seeing who was best actress/actor and which was the best film and sometimes the director, if he/she is a recognizable personality. However, it’s the screenwriters, cinematographers, assistant directors, and other invisible crew that lay the groundwork for telling a compelling story.

    Like

    • Yes!! Your thoughts resonate with me in so many ways. As I look back in my life, there have been those who have made a difference to my life, to the direction I have taken. We each have a compelling story, but we all, as you have said so eloquently, have “other invisible crew that lay the groundwork.”

      Like

    • Thank you! I’m glad that you find this series interesting. There are many stories that come from the time of the Industrial Revolution. Stories that have meaning in our technologically connected world. Thank you for joining the dialogue – much appreciated.

      Like

    • Thank you so much!!! All is well in my world. Today in the passing of the Old Year in China; we are entering the Year of the Horse. This is the quote that I’m taking into the New Year:

      “Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.”
      ― Confucius

      Like

    • Indeed, we are fortunate. May we embrace our role with joyful anticipation. To share the stage is the best of all worlds! 🙂 Thank you so much for your comments-very much appreciated.

      Like

    • A very interesting and profound thought. In this story, I am particularly interested in how the Industrial Revolution defined success; and how that legacy continues to impact on thoughts of success in our age. Thank you so much for adding to the dialogue!

      Like

  2. “Let’s drink to the hard working people, raise our glass to the salt of the earth.” Without them we would all be toast. Excellent and informative as usual Rebecca~

    Like

    • Well said!! I love that song – in fact, I’m playing it right now. Goes along with this Abraham Lincoln quote:

      “The Lord prefers common-looking people. That is why he made so many of them.”

      Like

    • Thank you, Valerie! Your visits always bring sunshine to my day. I have been away from blogging for a couple of weeks so am now ready to begin this series. The Arkwright “chronicles” have given me a great deal to think about over the past couple of months.

      Like

  3. Very informative post! I believe we all have our part to play, some larger than others. Some strive for the accolades, while others are content to take a back seat.

    Like

    • How well said. I think that we all want to play our part, whatever form it takes, in a way that allows us to live abundantly. Do you remember the Desiderata – we loved to quote it in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s. I especially liked the first paragraph, which confirms your thoughtful comments:

      “Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence.
      As far as possible without surrender be on good terms with all persons.
      Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story.
      Avoid loud and aggressive persons, they are vexations to the spirit.
      If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter;
      for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.”

      Like

  4. I like your answer to Tess, and look forward to more. This post speaks to the success of relationships in life and to/for me what’s really important, including the “other”. It really resonates when someone is humble about their achievements and gives credit where credit is due, along with accepting their own. And, it means so much to others to be recognized. Yet, so pervasive in our society is single mindedness, ego centrism, “me me me”, and isn’t it interesting that it doesn’t open our hearts when that happens. It all speaks to humility and hubris, I suppose. For the record, I’m a team player and would rather be an indian than a chief.

    So nice to have you back over the cyber horizon. Love, Paulette

    Like

    • Ah, Paulette, thank you for adding your wisdom to this conversation. There is so much noise in our world that says, “me me me.” The issue comes down to sharing resources and the potential of garnering a greater share of the rewards, whether it be financial, esteem, or career opportunity. We connect getting the credit with getting “more.” Except we really don’t know if that “more” will make us any happier. To me, it is about setting our standards so that everyone wants to be a part of a team. Having said that, I want to be part of your team!! 🙂

      “Nothing is yours. It is to use. It is to share. If you will not share it, you cannot use it.” Ursula K. Le Guin

      Like

  5. Arkwright was indeed a very shrewd business man, and a hard worker who seized every opportunity to turn things to his own advantage. One has to admire his willingness to take risks, as without this, he wouldn’t have become nearly as successful.
    “Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.” ~ T.S. Elliot

    Like

    • Indeed, the risks were huge!! Arkwright’s ability to see the opportunity and implement risk management techniques was his forte. He understood the consequences of each action, and recognized that he needed others to help him achieve his goal. He was a brilliant businessman; I find his narrative compelling. Thank you for the wonderful T.S. Elliot quote. I have added it to my “quote” library! Your comments and presence are always appreciated!!

      Like

  6. “…and one man in his time plays many parts…” I’d forgotten this part of the quote, but it’s so true: sometimes we play a starring sometimes a supporting role. Sometimes we’re in the audience. I doubt that anyone plays a starring role in all his or her seven ages.

    Like

  7. Excellent post… 🙂

    Life is a great role-playing game with many “hidden” refinements – the real influence is very often blurred – like a big marzipan ring cake with a figure at the top – it’s not the figure that gives the cake the taste but do contribute to visual edibility – the real power person can easily sit down between audience blurred – many figureheads are remote controlled (in addition to their desire to limelight) as a puppet theater (no no I didn’t write Muppet Show)… 🙂 🙂

    Like

    • “The real influence is very often blurred.” Insightful thought on figureheads and an excellent analogy. Your comments reminded me that there are two sides to taking the credit, one being the person who demands the title, the other those who chose to confer the credit. Either way, there are consequences and outcomes from those decisions.

      Like

  8. Hi Rebecca: I wonder why your posts did not appear under my Reader and every time I have to look you up! Thank you for another inspiring post, I love to read all the comments and your response. Yes, we are now celebrating Chinese New Year, Year of the Horse. I wish you health and happiness !
    Denise

    Like

    • Hi Denise – I have found that when anyone changes their themes, it won’t appear in your reader. What works for me is to press the “unfollow” and then press the “follow” and that should clear up the reader mystery. I have “lost” blogs many times!! Thanks for keeping in touch – very much appreciated!!! 🙂

      Like

  9. Oh, I have same problem with Denice. That’s why I always came late to read your precious posts. I will try to unfollow and press follow again. Hopefully it works

    “All the world’s a stage”

    The world is full of role
    The world is like a bridge of life
    Each of us can be a role
    Should we play
    There is reasonable role and pretend role
    Who get the credit

    Like

    • Lovely!!! Thank you for your insightful comments! I especially like “There is a reasonable role and a pretend role.” There is a suggestion that we have choice, that we can live without pretense – that our lives have significance.

      Like

      • Absolutely true, life is a choice. our lives must have significance, whoever will give us the credit. sounds never cross in our mind.

        You’ve never realized that you got the credit from many friends for writing this post. That is great. I love to read all of the conversation here. Very Interesting!!!

        Like

  10. Hello Rebecca 🙂 🙂 🙂

    What a great post, I love that you have selected this subject as these event happened in and around the location I grow-up in 🙂 🙂

    This is a big question isn’t it, not one that’s to big !!!

    I often wonder about the lost names the names that had just as much to do with history and its events as anyone, yet no one remembers who they are.

    I think there are two personalities at play here , people who are happy to achieve personal aims in a personal way and people who’s aims are to be known !!!

    I think in the past , social standing, status played a huge part here to.

    Today, this has not changed. Bill gates gets all the Press attention – yet he pays so many people not to be known!, His company has also purchased so many smaller companies over the last twenty year , Ideas and concepts that Microsoft did not even produce in house.

    It is not always the case the people who want to be known or are known, just get the credit without the work, yet it can be !!!

    You get the feeling that History is full of people who did the background work in all areas yet we have no idea who they are !!

    SO!!

    I guess you could ask, is being recorded of known, that important ?

    The businesses that sold ideas and concepts to the Likes of Microsoft, Most of these people have made a wonderful life from it !!!

    I hope I have stayed on topic as this is a great post 🙂 🙂

    Like

    • Hello, Nigel! You have stayed on topic; indeed, these are the questions that I have been considering as I look into the past. The Industrial Revolution gives us a backdrop to examine the dynamics of social development during times of exponential growth. We continue to see remarkable progress in science, technology and productivity. Humanity, however, seems to construct reward systems in order to maintain the rate of expansion. We like to excel, to make things better. And that is a good thing. I agree with your statement: You get the feeling that History is full of people who did the background work in all areas yet we have no idea who they are !!

      As to the question – is being recorded of known, that important? To me, that is a personal question. It depends on whether the reward is important to an individual.

      Thank you so much for adding breadth to this dialogue. You have given me new insights on which to ponder.

      I think that you would be interesting in the Hans Rosling video!!

      Like

  11. Ein grossartiger Post. Wie immer regst Du mit deinen interessanten Beiträgen uns Leser an, Gedanken zu entwickeln. Es müssen enorm viele Steine zusammenpassen, damit ein schönes Mosaik entstehen kann. 🙂

    Like

    • Vielen Dank für Ihre durchdachte und aufschlussreiche Kommentare. Ich genieße unsere Dialoge. Und ich bin sehr glücklich, dass Google einen Übersetzer, der uns hilft, zu kommunizieren. Wir lernen so viel von einander.

      Like

  12. You can’t do it yourself but there are exceptions and if you are the top guy, you get all the credit though there are some exceptions but when things go wrong the buck stops at you, no exceptions.

    Like

  13. felice giorno!
    le tue parole sono sagge , le tue foto incantevoli, hanno allietato i miei occhi, grazie

    happy day!
    your words are wise, beautiful, your photos have gladdened my eyes, thanks

    Like

  14. Hello ClanMother…

    I love your writing!!!

    What a great quote you have brooght to us here when you mentioned
    Shakespeare´s “Seven Ages of Man”…

    “All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players: they have their exits and their entrances; and one man in his time plays many parts, his acts being seven ages”.

    Absolutely meaningful.

    Best wishes. Enjoy your friday & weekend ahead,

    Aquileana 🙂

    Like

    • Thank you for stopping by and adding to the conversation. I haven’t finished this series of posts; this particular story has given me a great deal to think about. I look forward to our ongoing dialogue! 🙂

      Like

  15. Very well written – if we as an example think of the pyramids,
    it’s not them who dragged all of the stones that get the credits… 🙂

    Mostly it isn’t one thing which creayes a “subject”
    there are connections and synergy effects in it too… 🙂

    Like

    • How well said! I am in the process of finishing this series of posts and your thoughts add depth and meaning to the dialogue. There is not just one thing, one moment, one person that generates progress. It is a combination of human endeavour and specific requirements. We look back and attempt to provide relevance for our generation. I am enjoying this conversation! Thank you. 🙂

      Like

Comments are closed.